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At one time I kept a regular list of second-hand books, updated constantly as books were sold and new ones came in. This was fine when had we just a few hundred books, but after buying a couple of magic libraries stock increased enormously and books were going on and off the shelves rather quickly, so the list got more and more out of date.

We’re now working at getting a complete up-to-date list. This is taking some time. So in the meantime I thought I’d list books here as they came in. Here’s a few to start.

As with our former loved, lost and lamented list, the format followed is: AUTHOR, Title (in italics), Publisher, Date (where available), Number of Pages, and Price. The price in brackets is the original or current price, followed by our selling price. Abbreviations: hb = hardback; 1st means first edition (where there have been more than one); ltd means limited edition, if followed by a number then that’s how many in that edition; and sgd mean that the book has been signed by the author.

MENDOZA, JOHN. Mendoza Series of Personal Instruction. Morrissey, 16pp. (£10.00) £7.50
GARDNER, MARTIN. Mathematics Magic & Mystery. Dover, 1956, 188pp. (£10.00) £7.50
OXFAM. Crack-a-Joke Book. Puffin, 1992, 170pp. (£4.00) £3.00
BARON, HARRY. Close-Up Magic. Sphere, 1977, 160pp. (£6.00) £4.50
LEWIS, ERIC C., & TYLER, WILFRED. Open Sesame. Goodliffe, 1947, hb, 1st, 154pp. (£20.00) £15.00
DOBSON, WAYNE. Outlines. Magick, 1991, 28pp. (£6.00) £4.50
KAYE, DAVID. Power Marketing for Magicians. 2004, 48pp. (£8.00) £6.00
SANKEY, JAY. Cartoons by Sankey. 2001, 60pp. (£9.00) £6.75
ANDERSON, ERIC. Lecture Notes. 19pp, sgd. (£6.00) £4.50
PIERCE, JEFF. The King Has Left The Building… With Amnesia. 2004, 90pp, 1st, ltd 100. (£16.00) £12.00
KING, MAC, & LEVY, MARK. Tricks With Your Head. Three Rivers. 2002, 201pp. (£11.00) £8.25
THURSTON, HOWARD. 400 Fascinating Magic Tricks You Can Do. Wilshire, 1975, 253pp. (£8.00) £6.00
PENN & TELLER. How to Play in Traffic. Boulevard, 1997, 227pp w/ gizmo. (£18.00) £13.50
ARMSTRONG, JON. You Don’t Know Union Jack. 2007, 23pp. (£6.00) £4.50
McCLINTOCK, REED. Knuckle Busters Vol. 4. 2003, 18pp. (£5.00) £3.75
MIESEL, BILL (ed). Fork Full of Appetizers. O’Brien, 1982, 72pp. (£15.00) £11.25
GLADWIN, ANDI. Magic from the Session 1. 2006, 30pp. (£15.00) £11.25
GLADWIN, ANDI. Magic from the Session 2. 2007, 34pp. (£15.00) £11.25
GLADWIN, ANDI. Magic from the Session 1. 2006, 30pp, sgd by all (£20.00) £15.00
GLADWIN, ANDI. Magic from the Session 1 & 2. 2006-7, 64pp. (£26.67) £20.00
JONES, TOM, & WILD, RACHEL. Kiddies to Korporate. Wild, 2000, 25pp. (£8.00) £6.00
TARBELL, HARLAN. The Tarbell Companion. Burton, 1994, 150pp. (£20.00) £15.00
CARDURA, GARY. Deep Impact. 15pp. (£6.00) £4.50
KIMLAT, KOSTYA. A Lecture Collection. 2004, 49pp, 1st. (£15.00) £11.25
PENN, DAVID. The Lecture. 1995, 22pp. (£6.00) £4.50
POWERS, MICHAEL. Top Secret Close-Up Deceptions. 1992, 22pp. (£10.00) £7.50

Email or ring if anything’s of interest. There are a few rare, out-of-print books here. All prices plus postage at cost.

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We’ve another cracking lecture at The Magick Lounge this week. From Las Vegas: Kyle Marlett. Here he is in action:

Today, we’re told it’s hip to be square and Kyle has embraced the “nerd” label and made it a unique, personal hook that appeals to today’s modern audience. Hip to social media, digital content and authenticity, his persona is appealing, entertaining and aspirational. He has redefining what it means to be a “nerd” and creating a unique following of his own.

“Talented, off-beat and charismatic, Kyle Marlett performs mind-blowing illusions with singular flair. From close-up sleights-of-hand to elaborate new twists on classic illusions, Kyle delivers an endearing charm and infectious comedic deadpan whether on the stage, on the street or on camera.”

Kyle’s already appeared on The Tonight Show, Syfy’s Wizard Wars, and as a recurring performer on POP’s upcoming Don’t Blink. Whether performing one-on-one with celebrities, filming an impromptu viral video with the latest Vine star, performing for the camera or for a spontaneously-gathered crowd, Kyle commands audiences with poise and an up-for-anything confidence. He spent years honing his craft behind the scenes in collaboration with the world’s greatest illusionists and magic acts.

He has conceived, designed and implemented some of the most memorable illusions in Las Vegas, on Broadway’s highest-grossing magic show, on London’s West End, in films and on television. Recently, Kyle offered that peak creativity and trademark style in his one-man Las Vegas show where he performed dazzling new tricks and delivered never-seen-before illusions.

The relentless pursuit of astounding magic is his calling card, which means that we’re in for an exciting, entertaining and informative evening!

The lecture is £5 to SCM members and junior magicians and £10 to non members (visiting magicians welcome). It will begin at 7:30 pm on Thursday 22 September at the Magic Lounge, 82 Broad Street, Sheffield, S2 5TG. Doors open around 7:00 precisely.

 

I’m sure my esteemed reader will have answered all the questions correctly. But just in case…

1. Who was the first Honorary President of the Sheffield Circle of Magicians?

Answer: David Devant.

2. What would you use a French Drop for?

Answer: To vanish a coin or other small object.

3. What was Houdini’s real name?

Answer: Erik Weisz.

4. How many cards are there in a standard tarot deck?

Answer: 78. (22 in the Major Arcana, 56 in the Minor.)

5. The motto of the Sheffield Circle of Magicians is “Ars est celare artem”. What does it mean?

Answer: Literally, it is art to conceal art. In other words, true art conceals the means by which it is achieved. (It’s a maxim from Ovid’s Ars Amatoria, which means that in the best works of art the audience is not distracted by the artist’s technique, but responds instead to the power of the work.) T. Nelson Downs also used a similar phrase in The Art of Magic: “Let art conceal art.”

6. Who is generally credited as the inventor of the Olram Subtlety?

Answer: Ed Marlo (Olram is Marlo backwards).

7. Who said, “A conjurer is not a juggler, he is an actor playing the part of a magician.”

Answer: Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin.

8. Who was the Sheffield magician who gave Houdini the idea for the upside-down suspended straitjacket escape?

Answer: Randolph Douglas (Randini). In June 1914 Houdini was appearing at the Nottingham Empire. The teenage Douglas was at the show. Houdini was his hero and they had been corresponding for some time. They met after the show and it seems that Houdini was intrigued with the ideas of this enthusiastic young man. He travelled to Sheffield after his second show, to Carrington Street where Douglas lived with his mother. After supper Randolph took Houdini up to the attic, had himself strapped into a straitjacket, his feet tied, and then winched upside down on a block and tackle which hung from the roof. He struggled out of the jacket, which thudded to the floor leaving the teenage escapologist gently swinging upside down with his arms outstretched… Houdini recognised the image as a surefire publicity icon and continued to use Randolph’s idea throughout his career, as has just about every other escape artist ever since. (Source: Beedham, Ann. Randini: The man who helped Houdini, Youbooks, 2009. Kalush, William, and Sloman, Larry. The Secret Life of Houdini, Atria, 2006.)

9. Who wrote The 13 Steps to Mentalism?

Answer: Tony Corinda.

10. Balducci and Asrah are both types of which commonly seen magic effect?

Answer: Levitation.

11. Under what name did the stage magician, debunker, and scientific skeptic Randall James Hamilton Zwinge perform?

Answer: The Amazing Randi.

12. In magic a ‘restoration’ is an effect in which something is seemingly destroyed or multilated, and then magically reconstituted. What well-known restoration trick was patented by Horace Goldin in 1923?

Answer: The ‘Sawing in Half’ illusion. The first time this was seen, historically, is a matter of discussion. Robert-Houdin wrote in his Memoirs of a magician named Torrini who performed the trick in front of Pope Pius VII in 1809, but there is no other record to support that claim.

Horace Goldin, in an effort to keep exclusive his rendition of the illusion, patented the format that many people would recognize, using a box with the woman’s head and feet showing, and using metal plates to insert into the box at the cut sections. In the end, his patenting efforts only served to document how the trick was performed, rather than maintain its secrecy.

13. Who invented The Curzon Envelope?

Answer: Roger Curzon. (Anyone naming D**** R**** will have two points deducted.)

Tie-Breaker: In what year was the inaugural meeting of the Sheffield Circle of Magicians held?

Answer: 1920 (18 May).

That’s it. How many did you get right?

psychics-SCM

As is traditional, the December meeting of The Sheffield Circle of Magicians was a social evening for members and their partners. There were nibbles, a little magic, and a magic-related quiz (replacing the Christmas Puzzle Sheet of previous years following complaints from certain quarters that this required a level of thought and concentration unfamiliar to some of those attending…).

So the quiz included some general magic questions and some SCM history questions; most were fairly easy, especially for anyone with a little basic knowledge of their craft and their Circle. If you missed it, here’s a chance to try it for yourself:

1. Who was the first Honorary President of the Sheffield Circle of Magicians?

2. What would you use a French Drop for?

3. What was Houdini’s real name?

4. How many cards are there in a standard tarot deck?

5. The motto of the Sheffield Circle of Magicians is “Ars est celare artem”. What does it mean?

6. Who is generally credited as the inventor of the Olram Subtlety?

7. Who said, “A conjurer is not a juggler, he is an actor playing the part of a magician.”

8. Who was the Sheffield magician who gave Houdini the idea for the upside-down suspended straitjacket escape?

9. Who wrote The 13 Steps to Mentalism?

10. Balducci, and Asrah are both types of which commonly seen magic effect?

11. Under what name did the stage magician, debunker, and scientific skeptic Randall James Hamilton Zwinge perform?

12. In magic a ‘restoration’ is an effect in which something is seemingly destroyed or multilated, and then ‘magically’ reconstituted. What well-known restoration trick was patented by Horace Goldin in 1923?

13. Who invented The Curzon Envelope?

Tie-Breaker: In what year was the inaugural meeting of the Sheffield Circle of Magicians held?

The winner of the cheap bottle of wine was Ashton Carter with 11 correct answers. Can you beat that? (Without the aid of Google!) Answers will follow with an appropriate minimum of alacrity.

Cards Scene 19p_sm

New double-sided business cards.

GC 2Creative magician Geraint Clarke is touring will present his new lecture Polymath on Thursday 2 July. His unique style of impromptu miracles using everything from borrowed phones, playing cards and even chewing gum has been widely praised, with some of his miracles being used by TV magicians all over the globe.

Polymath is a lecture packed with Geraint’s original take on impromptu magic for magicians or hobbyists of any skill level, and contains some exclusive new effects that are yet unpublished.  Chris Kenner has described his work as “Awesome” (a widely used term in North America which indicates praise and not to be confused with the standard dictionary definition); “…a creative rising star in magic” Daniel Madison; “…Great Stuff!” David Copperfield. “Magicians, take note! Geraint Clarke is very good!” Ben Hanlin.

The lecture is free to Sheffield Circle members and £10 to non members (junior magicians £5). It will begin at 7:30 pm at the Magic Lounge, 82 Broad Street, Sheffield, S2 5TG. Doors open at 7:00 pm with our well-known alacrity..

How to Fest

Roger Curzon and I are scheduled to repeat our slightly acclaimed excursion into the rarely-trod byeways of magical history and performance for the experimental theatre company Slung Low in Leeds this Sunday from 3:30 p.m. I’m opening with an illustrated exploration of the curious history of magical invention, followed by Roger who will weave strange, magickal tales around the bizarre curios and artefacts discovered in his late, unlamented Uncle Albert’s suitcase.

This is a medium-sized but pertly formed part of Slung Low’s How-To… Festival 2: Magic & Showmanship. Sounds like it’ll be a great day out for some of the family. To quote their publicity: “Sunday 31 May is a day of performance, film, lecture and food from Myra Dubois, Professor Vanessa Toulmin, Russell Hall & Roger Curzon, Freddie Brook and Manjit’s Kitchen. And because it’s the How To… Festival  you can learn new skills in £paywhatyoudecide creative workshops though out the day; learn how to make the entertainment and the food. No experience necessary!”

The day starts tastily at 11:00 a.m. with Manjit’s Kitchen where she will demonstrate how to cook delicious vegetarian Indian dishes and curries, and you can then have a go at creating them yourselves – all ingredients and equipment are provided.

At 2:15 p.m. Freddie Brook plans to teach us how to Simply Amaze Our Friends in a workshop that will focus on “the performativity of magic and how to incorporate your own style into the tricks that you do.”

As I said, Roger and I will be strutting our various stuffs from 3:30 p.m., including a dab or two of performativity as the occasion demands.

Then at 5:00 p.m. Professor Vanessa Toulmin will take you on a filmic tour of Edwardian Leeds with live piano accompaniment presenting pioneering films of showmen Mitchell & Kenyon in Leeds. If you’ve not seen this presentation before, I highly recommend you catch it. Click here for more details.

There’s a break for dinner at 6:00 when you can enjoy delicious food from Manjit’s Kitchen and refreshments from the HUB’s £1 bar with free tea and coffee. Plus live music from Bianca Gerald before rounding off the day with a hilarious performance for grown ups from Myra DuboisAuntie Myra’s Fun Show is at 7:30pm.

I understand that there is a very limited capacity for all Festival workshops and performances so to reserve places please email boxoffice@slunglow.org with the number of places you wish to book for each event and a contact telephone number.

FESTIVAL SCHEDULE RECAP

11:00 Cooking with Manjit (recommended 14+)
2:15  How To… Simply Amaze Your Friends (recommended 11+)
3:30 Magical Inventions and Magickal Tales (recommended 11+)
5:00 Mitchell & Kenyon in Leeds (suitable for all)
6:00 Dinner and Live Music from Bianca Gerald
7:30 Auntie Myra’s Fun Show (Adult content 16+)

See you there!

All events take place at The HUB, 67-71 Bath Road, Holbeck, Leeds, LS11 9UA. There’s free on-street parking on Bath Road on Sundays.

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